The Homemade Mash/Lauter tun…for the beginner

    So here I am waiting for my beer to be ready to bottle and thinking I have nothing to talk about but I’m wrong…. I have way too much to talk about. As a matter of fact every time I think about it I remember that there is a whole lot more to talk about.  Here I am rambling on about nothing when in fact we NEED to talk mash tun or should I say Lauter tun. So I know what your thinking…what could this thing possibly be. Trust me I had no clue to its value until I saw it in action. Well I guess first off we need to talk about the difference between a mash tun and a Lauter tun. Now, I have to admit that I have been using the word mash tun and it looks like this has been the wrong word for it. According to Wikipedia a mash tun is a dedicated vessel (so it would incorporate a mash rake, heating device, insulation and some kind of rinsing or cleaning element) that is used for mashing in  large breweries. In our case we brew small amounts so it is called a Lauter tun since we can only perform part of the process (someone, anyone please jump in here and save me).

     So I have a pic of a typical cooler that I converted to a Lauter tun…and seriously its just a Coleman cooler that I’ve had sitting around. The conversion is fairly simple, you have to start with removing the plastic spigot. This is really easy…first remove the plastic nut found on the inside behind the spigot and then pull the entire assembly  from the outside exposing a hole. This will be where you install your new hardware. I suggest buying stainless parts since it is for food service purposes. I have included a pic with the necessary parts you will have to purchase in order to make the modification. I referenced www.homebrewtalk.com for some help and if you check out that site when you have time, you will find that they have a lot of good information that will be very helpful.

courtesy Home Brewing Wiki

   

    This is what the spigot looks like in the end…..    The barb on the end allows you to connect a clear tube so that you can run your wort into your primary fermentor. Having the ball valve allows you to control the flow of wort going into the fermentor….let me tell you it sure beats having to hold the tube the entire time. Assembly of the parts are in the order shown in the picture showing the parts laid out. The inside though is where we need to turn our attention next. This process is slightly more involved since we have to modify a stainless braided tube. I used one I bought one of the local large chain  store for connecting a faucet. I cut the ends using a dremel tool and removing the plastic tubing inside leaving the stainless braid. I then folded over the one end and used a clamp to keep it together, then using another clamp I connected the other end to the inside barb. As you can see this works pretty well and I have to thank someone else for it…again the plug for Josh and Justin, but I suspect they got it from someone else. In any case I need to say that this design works great since it rarely clogs and does not allow a lot if grains to get through.

    Well I guess that’s it for now…next post I will get into the bottling process! Don’t forget to tweet me and let me know what your beer goggles want to see on my next post.

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~ by beerandcake on January 19, 2012.

2 Responses to “The Homemade Mash/Lauter tun…for the beginner”

  1. […] The Homemade Mash/Lauter tun…for the beginner (beerandcake.wordpress.com) […]

  2. […] The Homemade Mash/Lauter tun…for the beginner « Bake & Brew – So here I am waiting for my beer to be ready to bottle and thinking I have nothing to talk about but I’m wrong…. I have way too much to talk about. As a matter of fact every time I think about it I remember that there is a whole lot … […]

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